camcarlson

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Favorite films in 2016 (part 2)

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Following up on my previous entry…

I haven’t watched the Academy Award ceremony in several years, but this year I’m actually upset I missed it. Turns out Bonnie & Clyde committed the mother of all blunders and misread the Best Picture winner, though it wasn’t immediately clear partly because everyone figured La La Land was going to win anyway. So when they reversed course and announced Moonlight as the legitimate winner, I was genuinely surprised. And somewhat pissed; Moonlight winning would mean my streak of seeing every Best Picture-winning film in a movie theater would have ended (it began with Titanic in 1997). As luck would have it, the film came back to College Square for one week following the awards, so Viet & I were able to catch it and keep my streak intact. I’m glad we did — it’s a tremendous, moving, beautiful film, full of hurt and mistrust and confusion and beauty and hope and I’m not really describing the film at all, but it doesn’t really need its plot described, just the emotions it brought out in me.

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“Moonlight”

Thinking back on 2016, I really liked Rogue One more than I did The Force Awakens.

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“Rogue One”

Right after Christmas we tried out a free one-month trial subscription to Amazon Prime, and consumed all three seasons of Transparent as well as Mozart in the Jungle, and the first season of The Man in the High Castle. It moved a little too slowly for my tastes, so I passed on the second season in favor of randomly selected episodes of Shaun the Sheep.

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“The Man in the High Castle”

Speaking of Aardman Studios, 2016 was a pretty good year for animation. I equally enjoyed the simple beauty in the adventure tale Long Way North and the juvenile crassness of Sausage Party. Kubo and the Two Strings was also visually stunning. But the real gem was the 1973 Japanese animated film Belladonna of Sadness, which felt like a watercolor version of Kill Bill crossed with Faust.

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“Long Way North”

Quality documentaries include Michael Jackson’s Journey from Motown to Off the Wall; Minimalism: A Documentary about the Important Things; The Death of Superman Lives: What Happened?; Oasis – Supersonic, and Dreams Rewired.

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“Sausage Party”

Between mid December and late March I also saw and enjoyed Beauty and the Beast (the 2014 french live-action version), Born To Be Blue, Dark Water (the 2002 Japanese version), Don’t Think Twice, Hacksaw Ridge, Hidden Figures, Last Days in the Desert, Little Men, Snowden, Under the Shadows and Zero Days. The FX mini-series “The People vs. OJ Simpson” was extremely well done and I stayed up until well past 2 a.m. Saturday morning watching the last 5 episodes on Netflix… though I still prefer the ESPN 5-part documentary “OJ: Made in America”

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“Dark Water”

The most overrated film of the year award easily goes to Manchester By the Sea. I was so bored sitting through this chore of a movie. Runners up include The Accountant, Bad Santa 2 (so sad, I had such high hopes for it!), Patriots’ Day, The Birth of a Nation, and Southside with You. Sully was okay but nowhere near as compelling as Captain Phillips was a few years ago.

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“Last Days in the Desert”

Todd Solonz has made a career out of making films that make its audience squirm. His latest, Weiner-Dog, definitely hit that mark with its awful ending involving two semi trucks. That’s all I’ll say about that.

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“Under the Shadow”

I thought La La Land was cute and charming but not the great film everyone made it out to be. Emma Stone did her best to try to sing, but Ryan Gosling, nope. The two of them can barely even dance.

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“Shaun the Sheep”

Written by camcarlson

April 14, 2017 at 9:23 PM

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Favorite films of 2016

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I’ve seen some good movies this year, a few I would consider “great”, but none have really stood out over the others. I guess I would say that, so far, I’ve been a bit underwhelmed. Well, maybe not “under”… just “whelmed”. Not overly impressed. Granted, there’s a lot being released this time of year, and it will likely take me a few months to get through them. Anyway, here’s what I’ve liked so far…

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“Captain Fantastic”

I really liked Michael Moore’s latest documentary “Where to Invade Next”, the 1991 Studio Ghibli animated film “Only Yesterday” (whose English-language release in the U.S. occurred just this year), the excellent sci-fi think piece “Arrival”, the alt-family Robinson road trip tale “Captain Fantastic”, the 5-episode 8-hour long EPSN doc series “OJ: Made in America” and the Netflix series “Stranger Things”.

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“OJ: Made in America”

(though really, who didn’t like “Stranger Things”?)

I also liked “The Witch”, “Midnight Special”, “The Nice Guys”, Werner Herzog’s Netflix-produced doc “Into the Inferno”, “Henry Gamble’s Birthday Party”, “Hell or High Water” and “Rogue One”, which I just saw tonight.

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“Henry Gamble’s Birthday Party”

Other films I enjoyed: “10 Cloverfield Lane”, the career-spanning doc “De Palma”, “Doctor Strange”, “Don’t Breathe”, “Everybody Wants Some”, “High Rise”, “Indignation”, “Into the Forest”, “Louder than Bombs”, “The Shallows”, “Sing Street”, “Swiss Army Man”, “The Lobster”, “The Program” and “Zootopia”.

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“Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem”

I was disappointed by “Batman vs. Superman” (I watched the torturous 3-hour long director’s cut), “Knight of Cups” and “The Neon Demon”. Netflix’s “I Am The Pretty Thing That Lives in the House” was so boring, I had to stop watching before the first hour was over. I watched “Hardcore Henry” and I can’t recommend it other than to people who like watching other people play video games.

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“The Witch”

I saw a number of ‘blockbusters’ this year — “Captain America: Civil War”, “Ghostbusters”, “Star Trek Beyond”, “The Legend of Tarzan” — but the one I would recommend would be the live action “The Jungle Book”.

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“Midnight Special”

My film list has been heavily marked up in red, both crossing off titles and writing in ones that were impromptu watches. I’d wager I watched about 200 movies this year. Given the size of films in queue with Netflix and Facets, it’s going to take me at least another year of heavy consumption before I can significantly “dial it down”.

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“Arrival”

Speaking of Netflix, I watched and liked the first 3 seasons of “The Fall” as well as the first 2 seasons of “Halt and Catch Fire”. Also, the first season of “Lady Dynamite” and the third season of “Bojack Horseman”. Their stop-motion CGI film “The Little Prince” was cute and enjoyable.

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“Only Yesterday”

Of the older movies I’ve seen this year, I really liked “Araya”, “The Dead Lands”, “Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem”, “The Gold of Naples”, “Kings of the Road”, the 1980 PBS film “The Lathe of Heaven”, “Lianna”, “Lonely Are the Brave”, “Murder by Contract”, “On the Silver Globe” and “The World According to Garp”.

 

Written by camcarlson

December 16, 2016 at 9:57 PM

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Favorite films of 2015 (part 2)

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Figured it was about time to write about the films I’ve seen during the first half of 2016. A good number of them were 2015 films I didn’t get a chance to see last year but wanted to. Always playing catch-up.

Of last year’s films I watched this year, I recommend two animated ones; “Anomalisa”, if you like Charlie Kaufman’s other films, and “The Prophet”, just because it’s such a beautiful film.

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“Anomalisa”

 

I also liked “Carol”, “Grandma”, “99 Homes”, “In the Heart of the Sea”, “45 Years”, “Love”, “Youth”, “Black Mass”, “Tomorrowland” and “James White”.

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“Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet”

I didn’t see the newest X-Men movie, but I was slightly tempted simply because Michael Fassbender is in it. I believe he’s one of the best actors working today. He starred in a new version of “Macbeth” last year that’s worth watching.

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“Macbeth”

Despite some misgivings which I laid out last year, I did see “Montage of Heck”, and I’m glad I did. A really well done biopic on Kurt Cobain’s life, which thankfully didn’t end (or dwell) on his suicide. A much better documentary than “Soaked in Bleach”.

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“The Annunciation”

Still regularly binging on Netflix, Facets and Hulu. Some great older movie’s I’ve seen include “The Annunciation”, a collection of historical tales featuring only children; “The Deep” and “The Deep End” (1970, not the 2001 one), “Viy” (The Vij) from 1967, based (I believe) on Russian folklore; and “Vasilisa the Beautiful” from 1939, also based on Russian folklore… both Russian films are available on YouTube.

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“The Deep End” (1970)

Last month we took advantage of a free one-month trial subscription to HBO Go, in part to watch the sixth season of “Games of Thrones” and the fifth season of “Veep”. We also watched all three seasons of “Silicon Valley”, a funny show by Mike Judge. HBO also has a knack for making quality original movies. I finally saw “The Gathering Storm”, “Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee”, “Game Change”, “Temple Grandin”, “The Normal Heart” and re-watched “When Trumpets Fade”. And, I watched most of the first episode of the first season of “The Wire”… progress!

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“Silicon Valley”

We saw Aziz Ansari’s “Master of None” on Netflix, and the Hulu mini-series “11/22/63” as well as the six new episodes of “The X-Files”, which carried the general feel of the first 5 seasons of the series. I especially liked the episode “Founder’s Mutation”. I’d like them to bring it back for another season, even if it’s a truncated one like the 10th was.

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“The X-Files”

Still waiting to see a few more films from 2015. They’re buried in my Netflix queue.

Written by camcarlson

July 10, 2016 at 1:42 PM

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Favorite films of 2015

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Favorite movies of 2015

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“The Walk”

I didn’t get to see everything I wanted to see last year, but amongst the movies I did see, these are the ones I enjoyed the most and recommend…

My favorite movie of 2015 is “Mad Max: Fury Road”. It was written and directed by George Miller, who made the first two films in the series (in 1979 and 1981). The man deserves an Oscar for what he’s done with this movie.

I also liked “Ex Machina”, “Inside Out”, “Room”, Sicario”, “The Revenant” and “Straight Outta Compton”.

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“Inside Out”

I really liked “National Gallery” though it was a 2014 release and I didn’t get to see it until last year. It’s 3 hours long, it held my attention throughout and I would like to see it again. Another 2014 film I saw last year and recommend is “Love is Strange” starring John Lithgow and Alfred Molina.

I also really liked “Steve Jobs” and am saddened it didn’t do better at the box office. It’s not a kind portrait of Jobs, which will turn off many who adore him. Michael Fassbender does some incredible acting and Aaron Sorkin’s script is on par with his work on “The West Wing” and “The Social Network”, perhaps even more impressive given that he’s creating three in-depth scenes (product rollouts) based on the best-selling biography by Walter Isaacson, a book that doesn’t focus on product rollouts.

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“Steve Jobs”

Other movies I enjoyed: “Jurassic World”, “Maggie, “Slow West”, “Chappie”, “That Sugar Film”, “The Visit”, “Crimson Peak”, “The End of the Tour”, “Love and Mercy”, “Chi-Raq”, “Star Wars: The Force Awakens”, “Sisters”, “The Walk”, “The Hateful 8” (too long, though) and “Bone Tomahawk” (a better Kurt Russell western).

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“Chi-Raq”

I saw “The Martian”, “Spotlight” and “The Big Short” and thought each of them was okay, but I have no desire to watch any of them again. “Spotlight” wasn’t as revelatory as it wanted to be (everyone knows about the Catholic clergy sex abuse scandal nowadays) and “The Big Short” annoyed me for glossing over certain causes of the 2008 economic meltdown while overplaying other aspects (this article does a good job addressing these issues).

Each of these three movies has been nominated for the Best Picture oscar, though if I had to choose from amongst of the 8 nominees, I’d be torn between “Mad Max” and “The Revenant”.

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“The Revenant”

I was disappointed by “Soaked in Bleach”, a documentary about Courtney Love’s possible involvement in Kurt Cobain’s death. To put it bluntly, the doc was very sloppy. I somewhat want to see “Cobain: Montage of Heck”, but like “Amy” and other docs about musical subjects that have come out recently, it feels like the music labels are partially supporting these films just to drive up sales of their catalogs.

I was disappointed by “Queen of Earth”. I liked the imagery of “Goodnight Mommy” but it was too torture-porn for my tastes.

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“The End of the Tour”

Films I didn’t get to see but want to: “Carol”, “Grandma”, “99 Homes”, “Anomalisa”, “Brooklyn”, “In the Heart of the Sea”, “45 Years” and “Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet”.

Between Netflix, Facets and Hulu, I’ve continued to watch many older films, I figure I watched over 200 movies last year, not counting theater films. After my annual new year’s redraft, my film list is now down to a single page… three column, 10-point font. Roughly 100 titles on this year’s list.

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“Crimson Peak”

Of the older movies I saw last year, the ones I really liked were “All That Jazz”, “The Execution of Private Slovik”, “The Hurricane” (1937), “Letter from an Unknown Woman”, “Mamma Roma”, “Panic in the Streets” (seen just after our honeymoon in New Orleans, natch), “Passing Strange”, “The Quiet Earth”, “Round Midnight”, “The Silent Partner” and “The Two of Us”.

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“The Quiet Earth”

I regret that I have STILL not been able to watch “The Wire”, but we did manage to binge on the first five seasons of “Game of Thrones” and “The Walking Dead” and all seven seasons of “Nurse Jackie”. The only show we regularly watch on Hulu is “Bob’s Burgers”, though it’s been on hiatus since November-ish. I’m cautiously optimistic for the six new episodes of “the X-Files” coming out… today, actually.

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“The Walking Dead”

 

Written by camcarlson

January 24, 2016 at 9:29 PM

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Movies and whatnot

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Haven’t written in some months. Let’s play catchup.

Still watching movies at a ridiculous pace, aided by subscriptions to Netflix (both streaming and DVDs), Facets, Hulu Plus and (for the next few weeks) a free trial membership of Amazon Prime… their selection kinda sucks, though they did let me enjoy the first season of “Veep”.

I think I found a way to con Netflix into sending me more than the 2-DVDs-at-a-time I pay for. What I did was load up my queue with over 100 titles, some of them listed as “very long wait”, and move all those to the top of my list. When they get a disc back in their hands, they find my next selection may not be available at the nearest shipping facility (which I believe is somewhere in Illinois). So they find another facility where it is available and ship it from there, emailing me a message that it may take 3-5 days to arrive (when in fact it’s usually just one extra day). In the meantime, they find the next title in my queue that is available at the nearest facility and ship that one as well. So they send me 2 titles for the price of one. Since my subscription is for 2 DVDs, it means at times I can have 4 DVDs out at a time, all thanks to their overly generous customer service.

Anyway, since my last entry (sadly, the only other one I’ve written this year), I’ve been trying to play catchup with a number of 2014 titles. The ones I saw and really liked include the Australian horror film “The Babadook”, Jon Stewart’s directorial debut “Rosewater” and the paintbrush anime “The Tale of the Princess Kaguya”. I liked “The Theory of Everything” but it wasn’t interesting enough that I feel I’d ever want to see it again. Ditto for “Whiplash”, though it’s story was a bit more compelling. I also saw “The Overnighters”, “Open Windows”, “Foxcatcher”, “A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night” and “Young Ones”.

I still haven’t seen “Selma”, “Love is Strange”, “Inherent Vice” and a few others… they’ll have to fight their way into my summer schedule.

So far this year I’ve only seen a few movies in the theater and only two of them were worth recommending: “Ex Machina” and “Mad Mad: Fury Road”.

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Recommendations for the following services:

Netflix — “In America”, “The Innkeepers”, “Letter from an Unknown Woman”, “Panic in the Streets”, “Passing Strange”, Yukio Mishima’s “Patriotism”, “Ronin Gai”, “Round Midnight”, “The Two of Us” and the early Wim Wenders film “The Wrong Move”.

Facets — Another early Wenders film “The American Friend”, “The Execution of Private Slovik”. Roman Polanski’s 1971 version of “Macbeth” and the 1928 silent film “The Wind”,

Hulu Plus — “The Challenge” (really neat 30s films about the climbing of the Matterhorn) along with hundred of Criterion films, and a bunch of older television shows like “Strangers with Candy”, “The State”, “Ren & Stimpy”, “Reno 911!”… because who has time to watch TV shows?

Actually, we did binge-watch the first four seasons of “The Walking Dead” — great show —  as well as the third season of “House of Cards”, which I did not find as interesting as the first or second seasons.

So there’s that.

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But hey! My life has not just been watching flickering images on a screen.

Viet and I got hitched in January (!!!) and we’ve begun the arduous process of applying for his permanent residency.

We spent our delayed honeymoon road-tripping down to New Orleans and Pensacola. In lieu of the bullet point entry I wrote for last year’s Yellowstone trip, I’ll condense our six days on the road to these six points:

1. I-55 through Mississippi is very beautiful, whereas the I-55 overpass by Lake Maurepas is a seemingly endless white-knuckle hellscape.

2. The French Quarter can be surveyed by foot in less then 4 hours; aside from that and the nearby historical cemeteries (which we were warned not to visit unless we paid to be in a tour group, lest we end up mugged and/or stabbed), I can’t conceive of wanting to go back unless I was there with someone who knew the city.

3. Within the French Quarter are the French Market and the Cafe Du Monde. Both are tourist traps. Avoid at all costs. Especially the cafe — it’s actually a chain, and you can find them all around the city (for example: across the street from the Hilton we stayed at) and they serve the exact same coffee and beignets as the original in the FQ.

4. There’s a neat tunnel on I-10 that takes you underneath downtown Mobile.

5. Pensacola Beach is nice and all, but if you’re willing to drive a bit further, turn left onto Fort Pickens Road and pay the $8 entry fee for the Gulf Islands National Seashore. Miles of deserted beaches, fine white sand, warm southerly breeze, green water and pelicans flying overhead. I figure the entry fee also keeps the riffraff out (like the noisy, obnoxious college kids getting drunk on St. Patty’s Day). At the very tip of the island is Fort Pickens itself, which offers guided and self tours.

6. Cutting through the Appalachian Mountains in Tennessee is fun. Getting stuck in multiple bouts of gridlock on I-24 within Nashville and just north of the city is not fun.

Here’s a fun fact: with an average elevation of -1.5 feet below sea level, New Orleans is the lowest city in the western hemisphere with a population over 250,000.

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Anyway…

Viet graduated earlier this month and just last weekend the government sent paperwork allowing him to go out and get a job. So between now and when he finds something, we’re planning another within-the-midwest road trip, something we could pull off over a 3-day weekend.

Been bicycling more this year. About a hundred hours in so far this spring.

Work keeps me busy. Get to the office before 7 and usually leave at 4:30, if not later.

Things continue to move in and out of the apartment. After graduation, Viet simplified his bookshelf and sold or donated a lot of books, and tossed out a lot of paperwork. Seems like every week a new plant finds its way onto a windowsill or out on our patio (ornamental cabbage and web cacti being the latest acquisitions). Picked up a much-needed coffee table for free and our new couch should arrive in a few weeks.

And that’s about it for now. Enjoy a picture from yesterday’s road trip to Maquoketa Caves State Park.

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Written by camcarlson

June 7, 2015 at 10:02 PM

Posted in Uncategorized

Favorite films* of 2014 (Part 1)

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In keeping with last year’s bright idea of writing two posts about my favorite films of the year, I’m going to write a little something about the movies of 2014 that I’ve seen so far and enjoyed. I have to do this past-tense as, obviously, I waited until after New Years to do this.

Anyway, here goes…

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There were four movies I really enjoyed in 2014. My favorite by far was “Boyhood”, a brilliant, low-key, honest story of a boy’s life. It wasn’t until just last year (2013) that director Richard Linklater revealed he had been filming the same four actors for a few days a year over a period of 12 years. We watch the boy, Mason Jr., and his sister Samantha grow up, and their divorced parents Olivia and Mason Sr. grow older and (in their own ways and on their own schedules) wiser. As much as the film is about childhood, it is equally about parenthood, though through the point of view of Mason Jr.; the film takes the autobiographical point of view of Mason, recalling both important and mundane moments in time. That’s how it is for everyone when taking a stroll down memory lane — sometimes we remember the monumental events that shaped who we are, and sometimes we recall some random moment, a song playing on the radio or a sunny afternoon or that time we rode our bikes down the street covered in slush and got our pant legs sopping wet. But I digress… Most of the adults in the film impart advice onto Mason, some nothing more than efforts to control him (his teachers, employers and both stepfathers) but some genuinely useful (his father, while discussing parenting: “We’re all just winging it”).

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My next favorite film was ‘Under the Skin”, a dark, seductive sci-fi thriller starring Scarlett Johansson as an alien posing as a prostitute who lures men into her dark cavernous oil-liquid sex-cavern of a home and literally sucked the innards out of their skins. Mmm-hmm. It’s a morbid premise, but Johansson excels in portraying the alien seductress, probably her best film role to date.

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There are only a few films by indie favorite Jim Jarmusch that I have really latched onto — “Dead Man” and “Broken Flowers” and the scenes from “Mystery Train” with Screamin’ Jay Hawkins. His latest film, “Only Lovers Left Alive”, starring Tilda Swinton and Tom Hiddleston, tells the tale of two centuries-old vampire lovers, awash in gothic melancholia. After centuries spent influencing music and science, Adam now spends his days holed up in a dilapidated Victorian home in Detroit (the perfect run-down setting for this film), sneaking into hospitals to buy blood like a drug addict. His wife, Eve, flies from Tangier to join him and shake him free of his suicidal funk. John Hurt guest stars as a vampire Christopher Marlowe. Jarmusch’s films are, for me, best enjoyed by focusing on the mood rather than the plot.

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And then there’s “Wild”, the indie film starring Reese Witherspoon as a woman who has lost everyone close to her, either through misfortune or by her own doing, and she embarks on a spiritual cleansing of sorts by packing way too much shit into a hiking pack and embarking on the Pacific Crest Trail in true greenhorn fashion. The film connected with me in that it rekindled a lot of memories of my time hiking in the mountains of New Mexico in the summer of 1997. A few memorable scenes — an older man running a camp graciously helps Witherspoon’s character strip the chaff from her pack and obtain proper footwear; the unsavory yet necessary muckwater treated with iodine tablets; being mistakenly interviewed by a reporter for “Hobo Times”; removing a boot to pop a blister and yank off a bloody toenail, only to watch said boot tumble down a few hundred feet of a steep rocky cliffside, immediately followed by much cursing and tossing of the matching boot in an act of angry defiance. The hike is something I’d like to try at some point in my life, preferably while I’m still “young”; that is, while I still have healthy knees and ankles.

I also really enjoyed the following:

“The Grand Budapest Hotel”, Wes Anderson’s saddest, most elegant film to date; my favorite scene is the chase between the attorney (Jeff Goldblum) and the henchman (Willem Dafoe) through the dark museum just before closing.

“Blue Ruin”, the most practical, bloodthirsty revenge film since “No Country for Old Men”.

“Interstellar”, a believable end to life on Earth, the cool TARS design and a star-swallowing black hole I couldn’t look away from. The docking scene was the most suspenseful four minutes of any film I saw in 2014.

“Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)” with its crazy two hours of drum solo soundtrack and 99% single-shot camerawork… and Michael Keaton, who is the most perfect person to cast for this type of role since John Malkovich in “Being John Malkovich”.

“Nightcrawler”: no one can tell me Jake Gyllenhaal can’t act after having watched this film. He is just great in channeling a greasy businessman version of Travis Bickle from “Taxi Driver”. Creepy sociopath with a laser-like focus on success and absolutely NO morals whatsoever.

“Citizenfour”, which has convinced me our government will do just about whatever it wants to regardless of the law.

Other films I’ve seen this year and liked include: “Big Hero 6”, “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”, “Chef”, “Cold in July” (much like “Blue Ruin”), “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes”, “Dear White People”, “Edge of Tomorrow”, “Enemy” (another great performance — two, actually — by Gyllenhaal), “A Fantastic Fear of Everything”, the 2014 version of “Godzilla”, “Guardians of the Galaxy”, “The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies”, “How to Train Your Dragon 2”, the beautiful black and white camerawork of “Ida”, “Land Ho!”, “The LEGO Movie”, Kelly Reichardt’s “Night Moves”, the strange of beautiful “Noah”, “Snowpiercer”, the ultra-trippy “The Congress”, the beautiful animation of “The Wind Rises” and “The Dance of Reality”.

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2014 has been a really strong year for documentaries. Aside from “Citizenfour”, I really enjoyed “Maidentrip”, about a 14-year old Dutch girl who became the youngest person to sail around the world alone, over a two-year voyage. I also liked “Life Itself”, based on Roger Ebert’s autobiography; “Tiny: A Story about Living Small”, “Jodorowsky’s Dune”, and the fist-clenching frustration induced by Errol Morris’ “The Unknown Known”, about Donald Rumsfeld (a sequel of sorts of his 2004 doc “The Fog of War”, about Robert S. McNamara).

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Now, some holdover movies from 2013 that I didn’t see into well into 2014 and wanted to share: “The Broken Circle Breakdown”, “Prince Avalanche”, “Inside Llewyn Davis”, “Dear Mr. Watterson” and “The Heat”. Two films from 2013 I really enjoyed and recommend are “Nebraska”, Alexander Payne’s touching tale of an old coot, his exasperated wife and loyal son, chasing a million dollar prize through the small dying towns of the Great Plains, beautifully shot in black and white; and “Prisoners”, a surprisingly captivating (and depressingly dark) tale of abduction and revenge.

Thanks to Netflix, YouTube and the UNI Library, I have continued to discover a number of great older movies:

“The Red Machine”

“Papillon”

“The Bird with the Crystal Plumage” (Dario Argento’s film film)

the late 80s techno-metal Japanese horror film “Tetsuo: The Iron Man”

the 1983 WWIII film “The Day After”, which Wikipedia claims was the most-watched made-for-TV movie in history (over 100 million viewers) and can be seen in its entirety on YouTube

a pair of early David Cronenberg horror films, “The Brood” and “Shivers”

perennial 2010 Portland favorite “Cold Weather”

Werner Herzog’s 2010 documentary “Happy People: A Year in the Taiga”

the 2012 film “In the Family”, a really really damn fine film about custody rights in a Southern state that doesn’t recognize same-sex marriages.

I also *finally* saw “Westworld”, the 1973 sci-fi western that was the first feature film to utilize digital image processing (to simulate an android’s point of view).

[I also want to point out I finally had the opportunity to re-watch the 1997 made-for-ABC “The Shining” miniseries, which is pretty awful.]

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*And thanks to Netflix, I have binged on a number of episodic programs: “House of Cards” and “Orange of the New Black”, both of which were better in their first seasons than their second; the entire series run of “Twin Peaks” and various episodes from the first four seasons of “The X-Files”; and “BoJack Horseman” hands down the funniest show I have watched in a long time. I also rented on DVD the first season of HBO’s “True Detective”, a very well-written and well-acted show.

Written by camcarlson

January 4, 2015 at 4:30 PM

21st Century Entertainment

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For several years my home movie watching had been done on either my laptop or on a 28″ Panasonic CRT model dating back to 2001. This particular unit was purchased by my brother and I for my dad’s 50th birthday; some years later he upgraded to a flat-screen TV and gave me the CRT (which replaced the 13″ Sharp I had been relying on since 1994). DVDs were played on a Sony DVD player purchased from Best Buy in December 1999 for $299. The Panasonic VCR has been traded between myself and my dad for some time, and I honestly can’t say how old it is, but the remote looks strikingly like that of the TV, so I’m going to guess another turn-of-the-21st-century product.

before:after

28″ TV vs. 40″ HDTV

Earlier this year I received a free Sony Blu-ray player but lacked the needed digital converter to hook it up to the TV. I also signed up for Netflix this summer and have been anxious to try streaming high-def films to a screen larger than my MacBook. So when Black Friday rolled around, I cashed in a few Best Buy gift cards that had been collecting dust for the past couple years and purchased a 40″ Sony HDTV for under $150. My meager entertainment center has now been upgraded to 21st century standards.

players

Lacy models the DVD player and VCR next to the smaller and notably lighter Blu-ray player.

I never utilized the plethora of connections on the back of the DVD player so they won’t be missed. Besides, I mostly rely on its built-in WiFi to access Netflix and Hulu content. The remotes are notably smaller and thinner than their brick ancestors, and after a few weeks of use I have found almost all needed functions can be access on either remote (screen size can only be changed on the TV remote). The TV sits only about a foot off the ground, but I find that’s about the right height for our viewing needs, given our couch-slouching tendencies.

dvd:bluray

So many unused ports! So much untapped potential! Oh well, from now on it’s HDMI and WiFi.

On top of all that, Viet bought a Google Chromecast a few weeks ago and hooked it up to the TV’s USB port. He can now stream music from his phone or his iPad mini directly to the TV. Through his Google Music subscription, I can stream every Mannheim Steamroller X-mas tune throughout the apartment. He also hooked up his portable speaker to the TV, which has remarkably good bass for its size.

remotes

Transitioning from a gazillion buttons to a mere several dozen.

Written by camcarlson

December 22, 2014 at 9:41 PM

Posted in Uncategorized